Thursday, September 17, 2009

Let the rumpus begin


Wander into the children's section of any bookstore these days and you will find Maurice Sendak's WHERE THE WILD THINGS ARE in giant stacks and prominent displays.
It's still a most beloved book even forty-five years after winning the Caldecott Medal. The reason for the current abundance, though, is to sell more books now that a movie is to be released Oct. 16. Director Spike Jonze certainly had to take liberties in order to make a feature-length film out of the simple storyline of a rambunctious boy named Max, who is sent to bed without supper and imagines a world where he becomes king of the wild things.
My favorite line may be: he sailed off through night and day and in and out of weeks and almost over a year to where the wild things are. Oh, and then they roar their terrible roars and gnash their terrible teeth. And Max sends them to bed without supper.
Such magic deserves replay, or, in this case, re-read. I hope anybody with children, grandchildren, nieces, nephews, neighborhood kids or any other available small fry acquires a copy of the book and reads it again or for the first time--before going to the movie.
Any fans of the story and illustrations should check out Cory Godbey's amazing online display of paintings by more than 100 artists inspired by WHERE THE WILD THINGS ARE. The works are scenes from the story reinterpreted by the artists in a variety of styles, everything from whimsical and atmospheric to abstract. This homage is humbling and awesome.
Did you or your kids love this book? I still do.

23 comments:

Terresa said...

Brilliant stuff! I love Sendak. I love Where the wild things are. And I love art. Tonight, I've come home to all three in your post. Thank you.

Sarah said...

Ok, why I haven't I read this book yet? Hmm. Probably the same reason I've never read J. K. Rowling or Charlotte Bronte or such notable authors.
I'll try to get my hands on Where the Wild Things Are, before seeing the movie.

Cybele said...

Best. Book. Ever.

Tabitha Bird said...

Yes, love this book. Can't wait for the movie to come out here in Australia. My kids love this book, so has every class I have ever taught :)

Rick Daley said...

We read this one often. My older son's name is Max, and that makes it even more fun.

Maurice Sendak worked with Spike Jones on the story and gave his full blessing and support. I have high hopes for this movie!

storyqueen said...

Tricia, it must be something in the air. I am going to do a post next week on books that changed my life, and WTWTA is definitely one of them!

Can.Not.Wait.
(for the movie, of course!)

Shelley

Natalie said...

I am ashamed to admit that we don't even own it! I've haven't ever read it to my kids, even though I loved it when I was little. I think this calls for a trip to the bookstore.

Lisa said...

Yes. I loved this book. A classic. I don't have a copy anymore though. I need to get one and keep. I can't wait for the movie!

Stephanie Faris said...

I don't know about the movie but the trailer looks a little disturbing, doesn't it? It's just odd they way they set the thing up.

Linda Kage said...

Wonderful book. I have a copy and am ready to read it to my baby.

And, yeah, it'll be interesting to see how they play it off in a full lenfth movie. That as well as "Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs".

Tricia J. O'Brien said...

Terresa: Glad to make you happy! I love Sendak and art, too.

Sarah: Oh, rectify at once. You can surely find it right now.

Cybele: *biggest smile ever*

Tabitha: So cool that kids know what's good.

Rick: You have your own Max! I did see a featurette with Sendak talking about working with Jonze, so I figure it's got that going for it.

Shelley: I'm really curious now to see that post when you write it. Since you write and are a storyteller, I'm guessing he influenced your choices.

Natalie: Now that the revision is done, get thee hence to the bookstore. Really.

Lisa: I love hearing how many people were touched by this book.

Stephanie: I always am apprehensive when a book is made into film.

Linda: Lucky baby. And,yes, movie versions are tricky indeed.

MG Higgins said...

Yes, I hope the movie does it justice. Thanks for the reminder about this wonderful book, because I don't have a copy and this is probably the perfect time to get it.

Yat-Yee said...

Love the story, love the imagination, love the language, love the illustrations. What a gem. I am almost worried about watching the movie...

Robyn Campbell said...

A Classic! I have this book. The kids have always read it over and over again. Our copy is tattered and torn especially around the edges. But isn't that a sign of a really great read?

I can't wait for the movie. What fun that will be. :)

Davin Malasarn said...

I'm so excited about this. The art work for these boos is so utterly original and breathtaking.

Tricia J. O'Brien said...

Melissa: I guess we have to expect a different kind of experience from the movie and hope the spirit of the book is intact.

Yat-Yee: love,love,love everything about that book, yes.

Robyn: So nice to hear the kids like to read it over and over. I think a good book should look a bit worn-in, as though caressed by many.

Davin: Isn't the artwork fabulous?

Sliding on the Edge said...

I love Wild Things. I also love Matilija poppies. I have a whole hillside that is in full bloom all summer. It made me so happy to see them on your blog.

Suzanne said...

Yes! A favorite of ours as well. I love this (I know it by heart)
Mischief of one kind or another....

Check this out! http://www.entertonement.com/clips/ztrmrdfrvq--President-Obama-Reads-Where-The-Wild-Things-Are

Tricia J. O'Brien said...

Lee: I want your hillside! ;)

Suzanne: I love that link! I love our President reading Wild Things. The world is good.

Tess said...

Oh, yes. It's wonderful. Can't wait to see the movie that's coming. I hope they do the book justice.

Tricia J. O'Brien said...

Tess: Me, too. :)

Abby said...

I love this book. And it's one of my kids' favorites as well, even now that they're "too old" for little kid books. :) Can't wait for the movie!

Tricia J. O'Brien said...

Abby: It's amazing how a really good book speaks to all ages and genders. This is an example of a "kid" book that is so much more. I just read an article by a father who picked it up at a library to read to his kids and was so astounded by the deeper message that it's become one of his favorites, too.